trap_ad_cwt

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Book Reviews

Reviews of Christian books

ChristianBookVideos.com has just posted their one thousandth Book Trailer for Christian books. Book Trailers, also known as book videos, are video advertisements for books, showing the reader what a book is about. A sample book trailer is shown below. Book videos started appearing in 2002… Continue reading
Those of us who were raised in biblical literalism blanch every time we see an edition of the Bible where editorial notes are integrated into the biblical text. After all, the Scripture is very clear about the consequences to those who add to the words… Continue reading
Booklist, the American Library Association book review web site, has released their list of the Top 10 inspirational fiction books for 2010. The editors at Booklist said, “Whether they feature contemporary amateur sleuths or late-nineteenth-century servants, the inspirational titles listed below handle their religious… Continue reading
Author: Fred Von Kamecke “Reputation management” is the new buzzword on the Internet. There are companies that will alert you if someone says something bad about you online so you have a chance to challenge it. These companies are going to make a mint off the egocentric and thin-skinned. Christ and Christians have been getting a bad rap for millennia, yet the Lord abides, and the righteous endure no matter what people say, so should Christians play the reputation game? In his book, Busted: Exposing Popular Myths about Christianity, it appears that Fred Von Kamecke is taking a shot at doing reputation management for Jesus, the Bible and matters of Christian faith. He is not on that Quixotian journey however – his approach is much more fun – he is a theological myth buster. Continue reading facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail
Authors: Gary M. Burge, Lynn H. Cohick and Gene L. Green Do you know why Jesus did not write his autobiography era book outlining his theology?  It was because all the teachers of this time gained popularity by the number of students they attracted, not the number of books they wrote.  None of the great teachers of that era wrote books–they left it to their students to do compilations of their teaching. That’s the sort of background information you’ll get from The New Testament in Antiquity, by Gary M. Burge, Lynn H. Cohick and Gene L. Green, a trio of professors from Wheaton College and Graduate School. Continue reading facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Enter your email address to subscribe to updates and receive notifications by email.

be a writer now